LWL-Industriemuseum Zeche Hannover

Opening hours

April - October
Wed. - Sat. 2 pm to 6 pm, Sun. 11 am to 6 pm
 

Pricing

Free entry

Eat and Drink

Restaurant in the mine fan building with adjacent beer garden
https://www.gastronomie-zeche.de/
 

How to get here

A40, exit 33 Bochum-Hamme, B 226 Dorstener Straße towards Herne-Eickel, 3rd crossing left Riemker Straße towards Herne-Eickel, Magdeburger Straße, at the roundabout the 2nd exit Edmund-Weber-Straße, 2nd traffic light left Hordeler Straße in Eickel and Günnigfelder Straße until the museum car park.

A 43, exit 15 Herne-Eickel, L657 Holsterhauserstraße towards Herne-Holsterhausen, left onto the B 226 Dorstener Straße towards Bochum, 3rd crossing right Riemker Straße towards Herne-Eickel, Magdeburger Straße, at the roundabout the 2nd exit Edmund-Weber-Straße, 2nd traffic light left Hordeler Straße in Eickel and Günnigfelder Straße until the museum car park.


Parking spaces available
 

Public transport

"Hannoverstraße" bus stop on bus route 368 (from Wanne-Eickel station towards Ruhrpark and from Bochum station towards Wanne-Eickel), per foot via Hannoverstraße and Grubenweg to the colliery site is approx. 300 metres.
or
"Röhlinghauser Straße" bus stop on bus route 390 (Von Herne station towards Bochum-Dahlhausen, and Bochum, Wattenscheid-Höntrop S towards Herne) per foot along the Günnigfelder Straße is approx. 400 metres.
 

The winding tower of the Hannover Colliery reaches up into the sky of the north of Bochum like a mediaeval castle. The primary object of attraction in the machine hall is the winding engine from the year 1893. The museum puts this facility into motion during demonstration performances.

An atmosphere of hard work characterises the interior of the hefty Malakow tower. It was here that miners entered the shaft at a depth of 750 metres to extract coal – until the Hannover Colliery closed in 1973 as the very last mine in Bochum.

The main themes in the museum are now the industrial heritage of the Ruhr Area and the history of its immigration. 

Girls and boys can playfully get to know the operation of sequences in a mine in the "Zeche Knirps" children's mine. 

The name of the colliery refers to the Kingdom of Hanover that was annexed by the victorious Kingdom of Prussia following its defeat in the "Reichseinigungskrieg" [Empire Unification War] in 1866. The merchant Carl Hostmann, founder of the colliery, came from the town of Celle in the Kingdom of Hanover. As a patriot he named the mine in the Prussian province after his homeland. 
One of the main themes of the museum is the history of immigration into the Ruhr Area that in its beginnings has strong Prussian accents. The many immigrants from the Prussian eastern provinces were collectively known in the Ruhr Area as the "Polish". The Prussian power elites judged them, as workers and Catholics with Polish culture, to be triply suspicious in the time of class- and culture struggles.

Mocking postcard, Polish miners in Westphalia. The song text reflects common clichés about the "Ruhr Polish" who emigrated to the Ruhr Area from the East Prussian provinces.
The 3-part lithography shows the Fried cast steel factory. Krupp in Essen seen from above. The artists Otto Bollhagen and Fritz Jacobsen created the work in 1911/12. The Hannover Colliery was the first coal mine acquired by the Essen industrial entrepreneur Alfred Krupp in 1872 for supplying his cast steel factory. The Krupp companies grew to become the "weapons armoury of the empire" thanks to their close contacts to the Prussian government and Emperor.

Contact details for booking event and placement offers

Telefonnummer

0234 6100-874

Fax

0234 6100-869

E-Mail

zeche-hannover@lwl.org

Tourism partner

Bochum Tourismus http://www.bochum-tourismus.de
Huestraße 21-23
44787 Bochum
Tel 0234-904960
 info@bochum-marketing.de

Ruhr Tourismus GmbH http://www.ruhr-tourismus.de/
Centroallee 261
46047 Oberhausen 
Tel. 0208 89959-0
info@ruhr-tourismus.de
 

Nearby locations